Stretching your vocabulary

curvy stretch in the morning

curvy stretch in the morning

 

“I hate (the word) overweight, because it implies that there’s a weight standard I should be adhering to.”
– Camryn Manheim

Advertisements

Fat Attitude

“Fat’ is usually the first insult a girl throws at another girl when she wants to hurt her.

I mean, is ‘fat’ really the worst thing a human being can be? Is ‘fat’ worse than ‘vindictive’, ‘jealous’, ‘shallow’, ‘vain’, ‘boring’ or ‘cruel’? Not to me; but then, you might retort, what do I know about the pressure to be skinny? I’m not in the business of being judged on my looks, what with being a writer and earning my living by using my brain…

I went to the British Book Awards that evening. After the award ceremony I bumped into a woman I hadn’t seen for nearly three years. The first thing she said to me? ‘You’ve lost a lot of weight since the last time I saw you!’

‘Well,’ I said, slightly nonplussed, ‘the last time you saw me I’d just had a baby.’

What I felt like saying…

View original post 129 more words

Not so subliminal messages

Justice is Blind, but… male jurors see big women as GUILTY

The study is simple. See the abstract below. Study participants were shown one of four pictures of two women and two men (one “lean” and one “obese”) and then read a brief description of a crime (check fraud) and asked questions about the alleged criminal. Of 471 participants, the “lean” males most harshly judged the “obese” female indicating she was not only guilty but was or would continue to be a repeat offender. Skinny dudes harsh on fat chicks. Science says. But it doesn’t say why.

 

Two articles on the same data. And we haven’t heard the last of it.

 

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/01/12/1434321/study-male-jurors-more-likely-to-find-large-women-guilty/?mobile=nc

 

Yale University study determined that male jurors are more likely to find an suspect guilty when that suspect is a heavier woman, with thin male jurors the exhibiting the most pronounced bias:

The researchers corralled a group of 471 pretend peers of varying body sizes and described to them a case of check fraud. They also presented them with one of four images—either a large guy, a lean guy, a large woman, or a lean woman—and identified the person in the photograph as the defendant. Participants rated the pretend-defendant’s guilt on a five-point scale. No fat bias emerged when the female pretend peers evaluated the female pretend defendants or when either men or women assessed the guilt of the men. But when the male pretend peers pronounced judgment on the female pretend defendants, BMI prejudice reared up. Jesus wept. The justice system and our basic faith in male decency took another hit.

The study offers further depressing insights. Not only did the male pretend jurors prove “significantly more likely” to find the obese female defendants—rather than the slim ones—guilty, but the trim male participants were worst of all, frequently labeling the fat women “repeat offenders” with “awareness” of their crimes.

 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2013/01/10/no_justice_for_fat_women_male_jurors_more_likely_to_find_obese_women_guilty.html

 

 

146485748

Skinny guys, keep out
Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

This month a team of Yale psychologists released a study indicating that male jurors—but not female jurors—were more likely to hand a guilty verdict to obese women than to slender women. The researchers corralled a group of 471 pretend peers of varying body sizes and described to them a case of check fraud. They also presented them with one of four images—either a large guy, a lean guy, a large woman, or a lean woman—and identified the person in the photograph as the defendant. Participants rated the pretend-defendant’s guilt on a five-point scale. No fat bias emerged when the female pretend peers evaluated the female pretend defendants or when either men or women assessed the guilt of the men. But when the male pretend peers pronounced judgment on the female pretend defendants, BMI prejudice reared up. Jesus wept. The justice system and our basic faith in male decency took another hit.

The study offers further depressing insights. Not only did the male pretend jurors prove “significantly more likely” to find the obese female defendants—rather than the slim ones—guilty, but the trim male participants were worst of all, frequently labeling the fat women “repeat offenders” with “awareness” of their crimes. And because the effect disappeared when the photographs depicted a man, the hypothesis that subjects were simply layering class-based assumptions—such as “poor people are more often overweight” and “poor people commit more crime”—on top of one another falls a bit short. (On the other hand, as one of the researchers, Dr. Natasha Schvey, explained to me over the phone, fat women are more likely to be perceived as coming from lower socioeconomic backgrounds than fat men. Somehow I don’t find that consoling.)

“What’s going on?” I asked her. Schvey suggested that stereotypes about obese people paint them as greedy, selfish, and thus prone to defrauding checks. My runner-up theories below:

Perhaps we (especially we lean men) associate heavier women (but not heavier men) with impaired impulse control, since obviously all female people (but not all male people) want desperately to be thin and are only not so when they can’t regulate their Cinnabon cravings.

Perhaps we lean men imagine that a nebulous fog of guilt surrounds all fat women, because fat—whether or not it is in fact unhealthy—is morally wrong.

Perhaps we lean men suspect that larger women, given their history of stigmatization by people like us, are generally unhappier with their lot in life and thus more likely to engage in deviant behavior.

Perhaps we lean men are especially susceptible to the proven bias jurors hold toward physically attractive defendants (one that, it’s worth noting, declines when we engage in simulated deliberation, aka use our brains to assess the facts of a case).

Or perhaps there’s another explanation! Lean men, weigh in! Why are you like this? Actually, never mind, don’t tell me. Just get yourself out of jury duty.

Check the data below:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23295503

 

Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Jan 8. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2012.211. [Epub ahead of print]

The influence of a defendant’s body weight on perceptions of guilt.

Schvey NAPuhl RMLevandoski KABrownell KD.

Source

Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

Objective:To investigate the influence of a defendant’s weight on simulated jurors’ perceptions of guilt.Design and methods:Participants were 471 lean and overweight adults (mean body mass index: 25.34±5.91) who read a vignette describing a case of check fraud while viewing one of four images of the alleged defendant (a lean male, a lean female, an obese male or an obese female). Participants rated the defendant’s culpability on a 5-point Likert scale and completed measures of anti-fat attitudes.Results:Male respondents endorsed greater overall weight bias than females (F (1470)=23.815, P<0.01, η(2)=0.048). A three-way interaction was detected between participant sex, defendant sex and defendant weight on perceptions of guilt such that when the defendant was female, male participants were significantly more likely to find her guilty if she was obese than if she was lean (guilt ratings=4.05±0.83; 3.31±1.03, respectively; F(1467)=5.935, P=0.015, R(2)=0.060). In addition, lean male participants were significantly more likely to believe that the obese female defendant met criteria for check fraud, and indicated greater belief she would be a repeat offender, compared with the lean female defendant (t(90)=2.081, P=0.040; t(90)=2.395 P=0.019, respectively). There were no differences in perceptions of guilt or responsibility between the obese male and the lean male defendants.Conclusion:The results of this novel study indicate that both weight and gender of a defendant may affect juror perceptions of guilt and responsibility.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 8 January 2013; doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.211.

BBG: Big Beautiful Geek

Big Beautiful Geek Girl

Big Beautiful Geek Girl

The Fat Lady Sings… and Dances!

110971578288304855_s4QKi7GG_c

Image

Previous Older Entries